Bourke, B. (2010). Experiences of black students in multiple cultural spaces at a predominantly white institution (Summary)

In this article, Bourke discusses how literature reflects experiences of Black students in cultural spaces. They begin by identifying three forms of examining diversity pulled from literature. These forms are structural diversity, diversity-related Initiatives, and diverse interactions. The study for this article employed five focus groups for data collection. They describe their process in detail, including how they coded and analyzed transcripts and utilized intercoder agreements. The study found that Black students who are engaging with campus culture at Primarily White Institutions are concerned with four distinct cultural spaces. These are athletic expectations, traditional campus culture, Black student educators, and privilege dynamics. Studies like this are important, because they reveal how affirmative action policies may provide better experiences for their targeted populations. This study reminds me of Noble’s book on algorithms. In that book, Noble discusses how search engines are often producing racist results, which is a direct result of the information that is fed in. This matters in practice, because academic discourse had largely moved into online journal databases. It also made me think of Asimov’s concept of a third intelligence. Humans program robots, then robots program humans into a new intelligence. Taking that concept to describe discourse, as an artificial third intelligence that is meta-human. If we think of academic discourse as an algorithm that is programmed by people, then used by people, what bias ideas might we be reinforcing as we continue?

Bourke, B. (2010). Experiences of black students in multiple cultural spaces at a predominantly white institution. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 3(2), 126–135. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0019025



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