Liminal Workspace in the Middle Range

Theory is a tricky concept. It is also a tricky word. A very tricky process. To attempt a discussion on theory is to commit yourself to hours of back-and-forth between definitions and ideas, fully knowing there will be no resolution. So why attempt a discourse on theory? Roy Ellen remarks that the different forms of … Continue reading Liminal Workspace in the Middle Range

User Experience Research and Design Coursework-University of Michigan

I completed the following courses of study offered by MichiganX, an online learning initiative of the University of Michigan through edX UX501x: Introduction to User Experience UX502x: Understanding User Needs UX503x: Principles of Designing for Humans UX504x: Evaluating Designs with Users UX505x: UX Design: From Concept to Wireframe UX506x: UX Design: From Wireframe to Prototype … Continue reading User Experience Research and Design Coursework-University of Michigan

Rock-Art Vandals: An Assessment of Public Interactions with Archaeological Resources

Word Cloud From Rock-Art Vandals Research Project Abstract: This project studied the public opinions and discussion of the effects contemporary humans have at archaeological rock art sites in the United States. Preservation of rock art sites is attempted by a perpetual separation of visitors, by creating physical barriers at sites, or keeping site locations a … Continue reading Rock-Art Vandals: An Assessment of Public Interactions with Archaeological Resources

Modeling Consciousness in Archaeology: A Non-Invasive Approach

Presenting at the 2014 Undergraduate Research Symposium presented by the Humboldt State University Library Abstract: Modeling the thoughts and beliefs of ancient persons is an arduous calling for archaeologists, as this data falls into the intangible realm. Often the most direct material link to the ancient mind is found in rock art. With resilience to … Continue reading Modeling Consciousness in Archaeology: A Non-Invasive Approach

The Sound of Silence: Suggesting an Evolutionary Perspective in Archaeoacoustics

Presenting at the 2014 Anthropology Research Symposium, Humboldt State University Abstract: Humans have a common practice of altering auditory perception, with the ability to extend their sound experience through creating instruments, building acoustic amphitheater spaces, and producing rhythm and music with the body as with clapping, chanting, and singing. The field of archaeoacoustics offers insight … Continue reading The Sound of Silence: Suggesting an Evolutionary Perspective in Archaeoacoustics