Categories
Anthropology Arts and Culture

Notes on Visual Analysis in Anthropology

Visual images are texts to be read.  The types of visual media are varied. They can be moving, such as a film, or still images. Still images include photography, paintings, doodles, and graphics. Visual analysis researchers the producers and consumers of images. Psychoanalytic theory focuses on the representations of images. A content analysis will look at images as a contextual narrative. Semiotic analysis relates what is signified by images as signs.  The chapter also describes photo-elucidation and memory work. These methods use photographs (or other images) to stimulate conversation on memories of participants. Photo-elucidation may be useful within a questionnaire, especially some photographs of damaged rock art sites.

Another interesting idea that I had not considered prior to reading this chapter is participant mapping. This method provides visual data from the perspective of the participant. For my thesis research, I would like to use structured observations and have considered each observer mapping the space as a participant. The chapter finishes with a discussion on ethics. The ethical considerations of visual analysis relate to protecting the anonymity of persona who may be in the photographs, as well as publishing and copyright issues.

For me personally, I find that there are many facets of visual analysis that are relevant to consider, as much of human computer interaction, and user experience is visual based, or especially when it isn’t. For example, with screen reader technology.

Notes from Ali, S. (2012). Visual Analysis. In C. Seale (Ed.), Researching Society and Culture (3rd ed, p. 283-). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

You can find this book available for purchase at this affiliated link.


Categories
Archaeology News

Center for Digital Archaeology Training Tips Blog Series

While I was interning for the Center for Digital Archaeology (CoDA), I wrote a series of short blogs based on a few of their webinar classes. This was a fun learning experience for me, because some of these topics were things I knew nothing about. It is always humbling to me how a little bit of knowledge can spark brand new hobbies and interests.

Browse through the links below to read my posts on the CoDA blog!

Photography and Photogrammetry for Archaeologists

Introduction to GIS for Archaeology

The Art of Narrative in Your Workflow

Lighting for Photogrammetry

Always Have A Backup Plan (A blog about Data Backup)

Choosing Your First Drone

Stop a Moving Lens with Tape (a photography equipment hack Featuring my favorite tool, blue painters tape..)

Placing Coded Targets for Photogrammetry in the Field

Questions for Clear Communication in your Project

To find out more about the Center for Digital Archaeology, you can visit Digitalarch.org


Categories
Arts and Culture News Research Methods Student Resources

HSU Unconference: How I Learned Shareout Building a Better Search by Going into Categories and Searching by Subject

From the Humboldt State University Library: “Nikki Martensen explains how to build a better search by going in to Categories and then searching by subject. By searching by subject, you’ll be exposed to related words that will enrich your search.”

Categories
Arts and Culture News

Delivering HSU History to the Silicon Valley

This is a press-release detailing some archival adventures that happened over spring break with the Humboldt State University Library Scholar Program.

Published in spring 2016

Categories
Archaeology Teaching Resources

Interpretive Poster Activity for Archaeology Courses

I created this assignment for an introduction to archaeology course while I was a teaching assistant at Humboldt State University.


Assignment:

You have been the lead archaeological researcher at a site for years, but a recent decrease in tourism has severely threatened your funding. In an effort to promote new visitors and attract funding, the site management team has decided to produce an advertisement campaign. You are each responsible for creating a travel poster with information to entice the public.

Examples of historic travel and tourism posters can be found though the Library of Congress digital archives.

Instructions:

-Choose any site related to this week’s lectures on the development of complexity on North America.

-Using PowerPoint or a similar program, create a single slide poster with 8 ½ X 11 dimensions.

-On a separate slide, provide your sources for images and information (this includes your textbook!)

-Then either upload to the class website, or print out and bring to a physical class session for discussion!

*Your Poster must include the following to receive credit:

-Name of Site

-Image of site (pick your poison: maps, photographs, artist renditions)

-At least 5 “facts” about your site (What will the public find most interesting about the site?)


Categories
Arts and Culture Digitization Museums News Research Methods

Creating a Gift for the Future: Digitization Using Omeka.net

“Creating a Gift for the Future: Digitization Using Omeka.net”, April 22, 2016

Contributors: Alexandria Jones, Blanca Drapeau, Cathlyn Garibay, KayCie Voigt, Nicole Martensen, Victoria Bruner, Xi K. Bromley

A Collaborative poster describing online exhibit creation. Presented at the Humboldt State University 2016 Ideafest symposium.

“The Library Scholar Internship team is digitizing historically significant objects from the library’s Special Collections. This process involves more than scanning objects, but publishing to a broader research community using Omeka.net to create digital exhibits. In this poster we discuss our process creating metadata, scanning procedures, researching the collections and publicizing our work. Our goal is to encourage students and faculty to use the library’s resources such as Collaboration Stations, SkillShops, librarians, computer labs, #mondopad and peers to improve and publish their research. The library is a dynamic space for students to work on innovative and collaborative projects.”