User Experience Research and Design Coursework-University of Michigan

Courses of study offered by MichiganX, an online learning initiative of the University of Michigan through edX

UX501x: Introduction to User Experience

UX502x: Understanding User Needs

UX503x: Principles of Designing for Humans

UX504x: Evaluating Designs with Users

UX505x: UX Design: From Concept to Wireframe

UX506x: UX Design: From Wireframe to Prototype

UX507x: UX Research Surveys

Center for Digital Archaeology Training Tips Blog Series

When I was interning for the Center for Digital Archaeology (CoDA), I wrote a series of short blogs based on a few of their webinar classes. This was a fun learning experience for me, because some of these topics were things I knew nothing about. It is always humbling to me how a little bit of knowledge can spark brand new hobbies and interests.

Browse through the links below to read my posts on the CoDA blog!

Photography and Photogrammetry for Archaeologists

Introduction to GIS for Archaeology

The Art of Narrative in Your Workflow

Lighting for Photogrammetry

Always Have A Backup Plan (A blog about Data Backup)

Choosing Your First Drone

Stop a Moving Lens with Tape (a photography equipment hack Featuring my favorite tool, blue painters tape..)

Placing Coded Targets for Photogrammetry in the Field

Questions for Clear Communication in your Project

To find out more about the Center for Digital Archaeology, you can visit Digitalarch.org

Rock-Art Vandals: An Assessment of Public Interactions with Archaeological Resources

RAV word cloud
Word Cloud From Rock-Art Vandals Research Project

Abstract: This project studied the public opinions and discussion of the effects contemporary humans have at archaeological rock art sites in the United States. Preservation of rock art sites is attempted by a perpetual separation of visitors, by creating physical barriers at sites, or keeping site locations a secret. Little has been done, however, to assess public access to information relating to site locations and preservation information. This project utilized open-ended questionnaires to assess the opinions of the online rock-art community in relation to this topic. These opinions were compared with the content in public texts to assess the public accessibility of information. This research represents the potential of an affiliated public to make a significant contribution to the discussion on rock art site preservation and public interaction.