Ritual Experience: Stable Isotopes in Archaeological Interpretation

“Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science”~Edwin Hubble Stable Isotopes as Archaeological Data Stable isotopes are the non-radioactive versions of an atom (Malainey, “Stable Isotopes”, 2011). Atoms are the smallest unit of a unique element. Atoms are comprised of protons, neutrons, and electrons in different unique […]

Three Views of a Cave Painting: How Intention Influences Archaeological Interpretations (2015)

Abstract This paper discuss three base perspective which influence interpretive efforts in the study of rock-art. The researcher’s view focuses on consuming rock-art as data. The manager’s view seeks to control and protect rock-art sites form contemporary site interactions. The creator’s view refers to the original experience at the site. These views reflect a tendency […]

Film Premiere: Making Ties: The Cangdong Village Project

On May 30, the Stanford Archaeology Center will host the live premiere of Barre Fong’s Making Ties: The Cangdong Village Project. If you cannot attend the premiere, the film can be viewed at https://cangdong.stanford.edu/documentary-film

Center for Digital Archaeology Training Tips Blog Series

When I was interning for the Center for Digital Archaeology (CoDA), I wrote a series of short blogs based on a few of their webinar classes. This was a fun learning experience for me, because some of these topics were things I knew nothing about. It is always humbling to me how a little bit […]

Rock-Art Vandals: An Assessment of Public Interactions with Archaeological Resources

Word Cloud From Rock-Art Vandals Research Project Abstract: This project studied the public opinions and discussion of the effects contemporary humans have at archaeological rock art sites in the United States. Preservation of rock art sites is attempted by a perpetual separation of visitors, by creating physical barriers at sites, or keeping site locations a […]

The Sound of Silence: Suggesting an Evolutionary Perspective in Archaeoacoustics

Presenting at the 2014 Anthropology Research Symposium, Humboldt State University Abstract: Humans have a common practice of altering auditory perception, with the ability to extend their sound experience through creating instruments, building acoustic amphitheater spaces, and producing rhythm and music with the body as with clapping, chanting, and singing. The field of archaeoacoustics offers insight […]